Scrambl is the first commercial product deployed by the security experts at OxCEPT Ltd.

OxCEPT is a London based cyber security company developing and commercialism authentication and encryption products designed to protect the private and competitive data of enterprise customers.

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MOD-logo-OxCEPT

DEVELOPED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, TESTED IN THE FIELD BY THE BRITISH MINISTRY OF DEFENCE

The British Ministry of Defence and US Navy required a means of bootstrapping highly secure channels of communication between teams in highstakes battlefield scenarios; within minutes, over any available network, and using any device.

No small task, but with funding of $1.1M from the MOD and US Navy, the Oxford University based founders of OxCEPT delivered a virtually unbreakable communications protocol which accomplished just that.

Oxford-logo-OxCEPT

PATENTS

Scrambl’s technology is protected by the following US and European patents:

US 8230229 B2 – Security in Computing Networks

EP 1998494 A1 – Security in Computing Networks

ABSTRACT
A system for verifying the security of communications between a set of nodes via a high-bandwidth, insecure communications channel. A number of embodiments are described for enabling authenticated communication between the nodes in an environment wherein there is a high bandwidth Dolev-Yao network amongst the nodes and non-spoofable, low-bandwidth empirical channels between each pair of nodes.

 

US 9270450 – Method and Device for Mutual Authentication

ABSTRACT
A method of authenticating communication between a first and second party (or node) over an insecure, high bandwidth communications network, in which the first party (C) authenticates the second party (M) using a communications protocol comprising a first communications phase through a first communications channel over the insecure, high bandwidth communications network to establish a secure mode of communications between the first and second party, followed by a second communications phase of receiving information from the second party over a second communications channel, such as an empirical channel, and enabling a user to make a human comparison of the information received from the second party with information generated by the first party thereby enabling the user to authenticate the second party in the event of the information from both parties agrees.